Congratulations everybody!

We have good news. Our project got a National eTwinning Label in Poland. We are so proud of it. Thank you for your support and all your efforts. We did it together.

 


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Uefa 2012 Opening match Poland vs Greece :)

http://gwizdek24.se.pl/euro-2012/otwarcie-stadionu-narodowego-zdjecia_224708.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/football/picturegalleries/8930414/Euro-2012-Guide-to-the-stadiums-and-host-venues.html

 

Hi!

This is the photo from opening of the stadium in Warsaw this year.

This Friday at 6 pm together with Greece we are opening Euro 2012. It will be perfect day 馃檪

We all feel the atmosphere of that even, we have flags on cars, on our balconies, at home.

Do you celebrate this event in your countries?

馃檪

Greetings from Zab贸r

UEFA 2012

Can you imagine?

In few days we are going to open this event!

I hope that all football matches will be perfect and wonderful shows to watch. I hope you will聽like them a lot.

Greetings from Zab贸r.

AW

聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽聽

First exam!

Hello!

Today our third class started first day of their exams. Today they had history, Polish, tomorrow maths and science, and on Thursday foreign languages-English or German.

Here is our photo made before the exam in the morning.

Have a nice day!

Agata W and my class 3a

Beautiful Prague!

We want to share some photos with you from beautiful Prague! This city is absolutely amazing, wonderful, full of wonderful places, buildings, great food, cafes, churches, monumets. Our trip was just gorgious. We went there on 21.03.2012 on 1st Day of Spring Day.聽 The weather and the athmosphere of this place was brilliant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have plenty of photos, this trip was really amazing. If you want to go to a beautiful places, you must see the Prague!

Agata Waltrowska, Ewa and Kamila.

Easter, good bye…

Hello everyone!

How are you? We finished our Easter time at school, but still there are everywhere Easter decorations in our classes and homes. I really like our class rabbit :

and we had a very nice School Easter Breakfast. We prepared Easter food, dishes and we brought them to the classroom.

How did you celebrate this time? Have a nice day!

 

Bye bye and greeting from Zabor

 

 

Agata Waltrowska

Edmund Pawe艂 Strzelecki by Paula Gucia, Zab贸r

Traveller, geologist and geographer; scientist of Australia, America; from 1853 a member of Royal Society in London. In 1834-43 he made some medical, geographical and geological discoveries.

1834-35

Pawe艂 Edmund Strzelecki

He was銆leading medical discoveries in USA and Kanada, there were discovered ex. 銆deposits銆 ore銆 copper (over 銆Lake Ontario); 1836-38 examin deposits銆in America South m.in. in Brazylii (Minas Gerais); there wasdiscovered gold in New South Wales.

Strzelecki maintained this discovery in secret on wish governor G. Gippsa, which feared a explosion of 鈥瀏old fever鈥欌;

1840 he first named a mountainSt. Kosciuszko in Australia 銆and discovered Land Gippsa; 1841-43 he was leading geological surveys in Tasmania.

Selected Writings銆(1960).銆Paul銆Edmund銆W.銆S艂abczy艅ski Strzelecki.銆Travel,銆discovery,銆work, Warsaw銆1957;銆P.G.銆Clews Strzelecki’s銆Ascent銆of Mount Kosciuszko銆1840,銆Melbourne銆1973.

Miko艂aj Kopernik by Damian Schaumkessel, class 1a

Miko艂aj Kopernik

File:Nikolaus Kopernikus.jpg

Nicolaus Copernicus (German: Nikolaus Kopernikus; Italian: Nicol貌 Copernico; Polish: Miko艂aj Kopernik; in his youth, Niclas Koppernigk; 19 February 1473 – 24 May 1543)

was a Renaissance astronomer and the first person to formulate a comprehensive heliocentric cosmology which displaced the Earth from the center of the universe.

Copernicus’ epochal book, De revolutionibus orbium coelestium (On the

Revolutions of the Celestial Spheres), published just before his death in

1543, is often regarded as the starting point of modern astronomy and the

defining epiphany that began the scientific revolution. His heliocentric

model, with the Sun at the center of the universe, demonstrated that the

observed motions of celestial objects can be explained without putting

Earth at rest in the center of the universe. His work stimulated further

scientific investigations, becoming a landmark in the history of science

that is often referred to as the Copernican Revolution.

Among the great polymaths of the Renaissance, Copernicus was a mathematician, astronomer, physician, quadrilingual polyglot, classical scholar, translator, artist,Catholic cleric, jurist, governor, military leader, diplomat and economist. Among his many responsibilities, astronomy figured as little more than an avocation-yet it was in that field that he made his mark upon the world.

Life:

The oldest biography of Nicolaus Copernicus was completed on 7 October 1588 by Bernardino Baldi.

Nicolaus Copernicus was born on 19 February 1473 in the city of Thorn (Toru艅) in Royal Prussia, part of the Kingdom of Poland

His father was a merchant from Krak贸w and his mother was the daughter of a wealthy Toru艅 merchant. Nicolaus was the youngest of four children. His brother Andreas (Andrew) became an Augustinian canon at Frombork (Frauenburg). His sister Barbara, named after her mother, became a

Benedictine nun and, in her final years (she died after 1517), prioress of a convent in Che艂mno (Culm, Kulm). His sister Katharina married the businessman and Toru艅 city councilor Barthel Gertner and left five children, whom Copernicus looked after to the end of his life.

Copernicus never married or had children.

“Towards the close of 1542, he was seized with apoplexy and paralysis.” He died on 24 May 1543, on the day that he was presented with an advance copy of his De revolutionibus orbium coelestium.

Mother’s family:

Nicolaus鈥 mother, Barbara Watzenrode, was the daughter of Lucas Watzenrode the Elder and his wife Katherine (n茅e Modlib贸g). Not much is known about her life, but she is believed to have died when Nicolaus was a small boy. The Watzenrodes had come from the 艢widnica (Schweidnitz) region of Silesia and had settled in Toru艅 after 1360, becoming prominent members

of the city鈥檚 patrician class. Through the Watzenrodes’ extensive family relationships by marriage, they were related to wealthy families of Toru艅, Danzig and Elbl膮g (Elbing), and to the prominent Czapski, Dzia艂y艅ski, Konopacki and Ko艣cielecki noble families. The Modlib贸gs (literally, in

Polish, “Pray to God”) were a prominent Roman Catholic Polish family who had been well known in Poland’s history since 1271.[16] Lucas and Katherine had three children: Lucas Watzenrode the Younger, who would become Copernicus’ patron; Barbara, the astronomer’s mother; and Christina, who in 1459 married the merchant and mayor of Toru艅, Tiedeman von Allen.

Lucas Watzenrode the Elder was well regarded in Toru艅 as a devout man and honest merchant, and he was active politically. He was a decided opponent of the Teutonic Knights and an ally of Polish King Casimir IV Jagiellon. In 1453 he was the delegate from Toru艅 at the Grudzi膮dz (Graudenz)

conference that planned to ally the cities of the Prussian Confederation with Casimir IV in their subsequent war against the Teutonic Knights. During the Thirteen Years’ War that ensued the following year, he actively supported the war effort with substantial monetary subsidies, with

political activity in Toru艅 and Danzig, and by personally fighting in battles at 艁asin (Lessen) and Marienburg (Malbork).He died in 1462.

Lucas Watzenrode the Younger, the astronomer’s maternal uncle and patron, was educated at the University of Krakow (now Jagiellonian University) and at the universities of Cologne and Bologna. He was a bitter opponent of the Teutonic Order and its Grand Master, who once referred to Watzenrode as 鈥渢he devil incarnate.” 1489 Watzenrode was elected Bishop of Warmia

(Ermeland, Ermland) against the preference of King Casimir IV, who had hoped to install his own son in that seat. As a result, Watzenrode quarreled with the king until Casimir IV鈥檚 death three years later. Watzenrode was then able to form close relations with three successive Polish monarchs: John I Albert, Alexander Jagiellon, and Sigismund I the Old. He was a friend and key advisor to each ruler, and his influence greatly strengthened the ties between Warmia and Poland proper.

Watzenrode came to be considered the most powerful man in Warmia, and his wealth, connections and influence allowed him to secure Copernicus鈥 education and career as a canon at Frombork (Frauenberg) Cathedral.

Education:

Copernicus’ uncle Watzenrode maintained contacts with the leading intellectual figures in Poland and was a friend of the influential Italian-born humanist and Krak贸w courtier, Filippo Buonaccorsi. Watzenrode seems first to have sent young Copernicus to the St. John’s School at Toru艅 where he himself had been a master. Later, according to Armitage (some scholars differ), the boy attended the Cathedral School at W艂oc艂awek, up the Vistula River from Toru艅, which prepared pupils for entrance to the University of Krakow, Watzenrode’s alma mater in Poland’s capital.Copernicus’ four years at Krak贸w played an important role in the development of his critical faculties and initiated his analysis of the logical contradictions in the two most polular systems of astronomy-Aristotle’s theory of homocentric spheres, and Ptolemy’s mechanism of eccentrics and epicycles–the surmounting and discarding of which constituted the first step toward the creation of Copernicus’ own doctrine of the structure of the universe.During his three-year stay at Bologna, between fall 1496 and spring 1501, Copernicus seems to have devoted himself less keenly to studying canon law (he received his doctorate in law only after seven years, following a second return to Italy in 1503) than to studying the humanities–probably attending lectures by Filippo Beroaldo, Antonio Urceo, called Codro, Giovanni Garzoni and Alessandro.As the time approached for Copernicus to return home, in spring 1503 he journeyed to Ferrara where, on 31 May 1503, having passed the

obligatory examinations, he was granted the degree of doctor of canon law. No doubt it was soon after (at latest, in fall 1503) that he left Italy for good to return to Warmia.

by Damian Schaumkessel kl. Ia

Rudolf Gundlach and his periscope by Micha艂 艁akiszyk, class 1a

In 1934 Rudolf Gundlach constructed a reversible tank periscope which without the change of the position still had the visual field of 360 degrees. This invention is applied up till today. It was patented in France, Great Britain and Sweden. German and Russians stole plans of the periscope away.

聽By Micha艂 艁akiszyk聽(13)

聽聽Rudolf Gundlach (1894-1957)